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IMMIGRATION LAW

Immigration Law Issues

  • Securing work
  • Securing housing
  • Accessing services
  • Transportation
  • Cultural barriers

About Immigration Law

Immigration law refers to the rules established by the federal government for determining who is allowed to enter the country, and for how long. It also governs the naturalization process for those who desire to become U.S. citizens. Finally, when foreign nationals enter without permission, overstay their visit, or otherwise lose their legal status, immigration law controls how the detention and removal proceedings are carried out.

Know Your Rights

You have the right to remain silent and do not have to discuss your immigration or citizenship status with police, immigration agents, or other officials. Anything you tell an officer can later be used against you in immigration court.

If you are not a U.S. citizen and an immigration agent requests your immigration papers, you must show them if you have them with you. If an immigration agent asks if they can search you, you have the right to say no. Agents do not have the right to search you or your belongings without your consent or probable cause.

What is USCIS?

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), is the government agency that oversees legal immigration to the United States. USCIS is primarily responsible for approving green cards, naturalization, work permits, travel permits, and other “immigration benefits.”

What is a lawful permanent resident?

A lawful permanent resident, also known as a “green card holder,” is a foreign national who is authorized to live and work anywhere in the United States, sponsor certain relatives for their own green cards, and ultimately apply for U.S. citizenship.

What is conditional permanent residence?

A conditional green card is valid for only 2 years, and the designation “CR1” on the physical card stands for “conditional resident.” A conditional green card holder must file Form I-751 to “remove the conditions” and obtain a permanent green card. In most cases, a conditional green card is issued to a spouse who has been married for less than 2 years at the time their green card was first approved.

Why would a green card application be denied?

A green card application may be denied by the U.S. government for several reasons, including but not limited to mistakes on the required forms, missing documents, insufficient financial resources, or failure to demonstrate eligibility.

Factors of Immigration Law

  • Social
  • political
  • Economic
  • Ecological

Immigration Law Organizations

  • United States Citizenship and Immigration Services
  • Board of Immigration Appeals
  • National Immigration Law Center
  • Pro Bono Net